Seven Years In Tibet Film Soundtrack Soundtrack from Classical

Seven Years In Tibet Film Soundtrack Soundtrack from Classical
Seven Years In Tibet Film Soundtrack Soundtrack from Classical Seven Years In Tibet Film Soundtrack Soundtrack from Classical Seven Years In Tibet Film Soundtrack Soundtrack from Classical (click images to enlarge)
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Seven Years In Tibet Film Soundtrack Soundtrack from Classical

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Description of Seven Years In Tibet Film Soundtrack Soundtrack by Classical

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Based on real events, director Jean-Jacques Annaud's Seven Years in Tibet tells the story of the Austrian athlete Heinrich Harrer, played by Brad Pitt, who in the late 1930s escaped British interment to cross the Tibetan plateau to Lhasa, the Forbidden City. There, over a period of seven years, his life was transformed by a culture utterly alien to anything he had experienced in Europe. The sheer diversity of John Williams's writing should no longer surprise, yet once again he dazzles, his score being richly burnished, polished like finest rosewood, elegant, refined and deeply lyrical. Williams's majestic main theme is on an epic scale, portraying the serene yet implacable beauty of a land at the top of the world. Elsewhere the scoring takes on the most delicate and subtle of colours, with the internationally renown cellist Yo-Yo Ma's eloquent solo playing giving voice to a restless emotional and spiritual quest, further resonance being gained from the seamless interpolation, on two tracks, of the music of the Gyuto Monks. The result is a film music masterpiece, a fine companion to Philip Glass's score for Kundun (1997) and Eduard Artemiev's ravishingly beautiful Urga (1991). --Gary S. Dalkin